Editor in chief of Specter. Occasional writer. Obligated by law to mention Brooklyn residence.

Settle down in your room at a moment when you have nothing else to do. Say “I am now with myself,” and just sit with yourself. After an amazingly short time you will most likely feel bored.

This teaches us one very useful thing. It gives us insight into the fact that if after ten minutes of being alone with ourselves we feel like that, it is no wonder that others should feel equally bored! Why is this so? It is so because we have so little to offer to our own selves as food for thought, for emotion and for life.

If you watch your life carefully you will discover quite soon that we hardly ever live from within outwards; instead we respond to incitement, to excitement. In other words, we live by reflection, by reaction…We are completely empty, we do not act from within ourselves but accept as our life a life which is actually fed in from the outside; we are used to things happening which compel us to do other things.

How seldom can we live simply by means of the depth and the richness we assume that there is within ourselves.

- Metropolitan Anthony Of Sourozh, from Why Is This So? (via violentwavesofemotion)

forever re-blog

uniquenoir:




Black Weirdo Of The Week 18: Mambu Badu
Name:
MAMBU BADU is composed of Allison McDaniel, Danielle Scruggs, Kameelah Rasheed, and Yodith Dammlash

From:
MAMBU BADU was birthed on the internet through Twitter, but all of us—with the exception of Kameelah (based in BK)—can be found in the DC Metro Area.
Mini Bio:
MAMBU BADU is a collective of cultural producers and artists who curate art-based experiences that center the process and product of black self-identified women with a focus on photo-based work.

Founded in 2010 by Kameelah Rasheed, Allison McDaniel, and Danielle Scruggs, we curate biannual shows and publications in addition to independent projects. For 2014, we will be curating a show in Washington D.C.’s Vivid Solutions Gallery as well as organizing a series of public programming to bridge the gap between the gallery and the community. In the past, MAMBU BADU collective founders have curated art experiences in spaces such as the Median (Washington, D.C.) and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (Harlem, NY).
We are especially keen on collaborations that encourage community engagement, inquiry, and artistic exploration. While MAMBU BADU began as a collective of photographers, our vision has evolved to create space to not only create art but to interrogate art practices. We want to explore the dialectical relationship between theory and practice as well as the space between contemplation and creation. We want to map the materialization of thoughts and histories. 

When not working with MB,

Danielle works as a photo editor at LivingSocial, shoots her own personal projects, elbows her way to the front row at concerts at her favorite venues in DC (Black Cat, 9:30, Howard Theatre), listens to a lot of public radio, and drinks a lot of coffee. She is also a co-founder of DDAY Collective, created specifically to support and promote emerging artists of black/African descent in the DC Metropolitan area.


Kameelah works as a gallery studio instructor at the Brooklyn Museum. After five years of teaching in the public schools and a decade of working with youth, she is now a teacher coach guiding NYC public school teachers in strong curriculum development and instruction. When not working, she is a researcher exploring Black Atlantic spiritual traditions, a seeker of nature in NYC, a closeted fiction writer and an interviewer who has penned conversations with writers and artists like Kiese Laymon, Victor LaValle, Nnedi Okorafor and Dread Scott.


Yodith works on her own personal projects (mainly that exploring her Ethiopian ancestry and black womanhood), is stuck in the 1990s musically, is always on the hunt for a new photography book and never passes up bubble tea.





Allison works random day jobs, freelances as a graphic designer and photographer, prints entirely too many JSTOR articles, and is always on the hunt for a new bourbon.

What is your craft/career/creative expression?
We live in the space of photo-based art — from traditional fine art photography to mixed-medium to image appropriation.

How long have you been working at your craft?
MAMBU BADU will have its fourth birthday on September 20, 2014.
Danielle has been a photographer for most of her life, but didn’t take it seriously until around 2007, when she was 22 and a year out of her undergraduate studies.

Kameelah’s mother says she was asking a lot of questions, taking observation notes, and sketching since she could talk and hold a pen.    Professionally? Five Years.

Yodith has been photographing since 2004 when she decided to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Art Photography.

Allison took a darkroom course in 2001 and has been obsessed since.
Why do you consider yourself a Black Weirdo?


Danielle is a Black Weirdo because she has always resided in the margins of the margins. Always slightly offbeat and off-kilter and never quite in lockstep with what’s popular. Which she realizes is actually an ok thing.

Kameelah is a Black Weirdo because she approaches the world with the curiosity of a 7-year-old kid.

Yodith is a Black Weirdo because she always considered herself to be in two worlds, of two cultures, which sometimes leaves her on the outside of both. Raised in America by immigrant parents, she is as undeniably African-American as she is an Ethiopian in America.

Allison is a Black Weirdo because normality is the nemesis of creativity.


Links/Social Media:
Mambu Badu  
@mambubadu - twitter, tumblr, instagram, and FB
MambuBadu.com -main site
Danielle 

@dascruggs- twitter, instagram
daniellescruggs.com - portfolio site

blog.daniellescrugs.com -journal/inspiration repository

Kameelah 

Twitter: @_kameelahr
Instagram: kameelahr
www.kameelahr.com - portfolio site
www.blog.kameelahr.com - blog

Yodith 

@yodithnprogress- twitter, instagram
Yodithd.com- portfolio/website
Yodithinprogress.tumblr.com- blog/inspirations

Allison
@alice_wonder - twitter
@missalicewonder - instagram
alicewonder.tumblr.com - visual reference materials and folio work

Upcoming events/ projects? 

MAMBU BADU
May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9


Danielle 
 March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery 

March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery 


April 2014: Officially launching The Vanguard, an audio-visual exploration of the creative processes and practices of visual, literary, and performing artists in the D.C. Metropolitan area


July 2014: Solo exhibit of photographic work as part of DDAY Collective’s quarterly solo showcases


Kameelah 



March 1-May 10 — Arts Educator // Brooklyn Museum — Teaching youth digital media class in conjunction with the exhibition, Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties (NYC) through a fictional department of the US government called DISPUS (Department for Inquiry on Social Problems and their Urgent Solutions) where students photograph and interview Brooklyn residents regarding social problems.



April 5th: Group Exhibit // The Afrofuturist Affair: The Time Travel Convention at Yell Gallery (Philly) // installed a time travel machine using found material culture and published a hand bound book entitled “how to time travel with your mother’s hair, used tea bags and found photographs: a handbook and starter kit for practical time travel” (edition of 10)


April 12th: Panelist // NYU for the Radical Archiving Conference // speaking with other archivists about my first solo installation No Instructions for Assembly where I created a 30’ x 20’ x 20’ installation using fragments and found material culture to reimagine my family’s archive and to  activate dialogues around a trinity of spatial trauma - homelessness, displacement, and forced migration.



April 18th: Group Exhibit // The Center for Book Arts - exploring themes born from transient religious encounters and found religious pamphlets over the past 7 years 1) debut of conceptual sound art project that features collected street sermons 2) a book of scripture prose that plays with intertextuality, William S. Boroughs’ aleatory cut-up literary methods, Jean Lescure of Oulipo’s N+7 procedure, and Harryette Mullen’s abecedarian games 3) a reinterpreted subway map and 4) a series of digital c-prints of religious sites (NYC)


June 13th: Artist Talk // Center for Book Arts (NYC)



May 17th:  Panelist // Queens Museum for Open Engagement Conference, “Dropping In/Dropping Out of Communities” — discussing rituals and ethics around social practice art work in communities that may not be our own (NYC)


May/June: Group Exhibit // (Can’t share all the deets now but it will be a large installation that takes over an entire one bedroom apartment to explore ideas of democratized archiving, vestigial flickers and audience activation of spaces)



July 2014: Artist-in-Residence // Vermont Studio Center - will be working on a series of large text drawings and a javascript-based program exploring the parallels between computer errors and the messages and microaggressions marginalized people encounter (VT)


July 2014: Teaching Artist-in-Residence // Working Classroom, teaching 2 week class around using found materials to create installations and sculptural pieces that address migration, transition, and displacement  (NM)


August 2014: Continuing work documenting black religious communities in the North East


Yodith 
Currently working on an archival project involving slides photographed by my uncle in in the 1960s during his world travels.

uniquenoir:

Black Weirdo Of The Week 18: Mambu Badu

Name:

MAMBU BADU is composed of Allison McDaniel, Danielle Scruggs, Kameelah Rasheed, and Yodith Dammlash

From:

MAMBU BADU was birthed on the internet through Twitter, but all of us—with the exception of Kameelah (based in BK)—can be found in the DC Metro Area.

Mini Bio:

MAMBU BADU is a collective of cultural producers and artists who curate art-based experiences that center the process and product of black self-identified women with a focus on photo-based work.

Founded in 2010 by Kameelah Rasheed, Allison McDaniel, and Danielle Scruggs, we curate biannual shows and publications in addition to independent projects. For 2014, we will be curating a show in Washington D.C.’s Vivid Solutions Gallery as well as organizing a series of public programming to bridge the gap between the gallery and the community. In the past, MAMBU BADU collective founders have curated art experiences in spaces such as the Median (Washington, D.C.) and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (Harlem, NY).

We are especially keen on collaborations that encourage community engagement, inquiry, and artistic exploration. While MAMBU BADU began as a collective of photographers, our vision has evolved to create space to not only create art but to interrogate art practices. We want to explore the dialectical relationship between theory and practice as well as the space between contemplation and creation. We want to map the materialization of thoughts and histories.

When not working with MB,

Danielle works as a photo editor at LivingSocial, shoots her own personal projects, elbows her way to the front row at concerts at her favorite venues in DC (Black Cat, 9:30, Howard Theatre), listens to a lot of public radio, and drinks a lot of coffee. She is also a co-founder of DDAY Collective, created specifically to support and promote emerging artists of black/African descent in the DC Metropolitan area.

Kameelah works as a gallery studio instructor at the Brooklyn Museum. After five years of teaching in the public schools and a decade of working with youth, she is now a teacher coach guiding NYC public school teachers in strong curriculum development and instruction. When not working, she is a researcher exploring Black Atlantic spiritual traditions, a seeker of nature in NYC, a closeted fiction writer and an interviewer who has penned conversations with writers and artists like Kiese Laymon, Victor LaValle, Nnedi Okorafor and Dread Scott.

Yodith works on her own personal projects (mainly that exploring her Ethiopian ancestry and black womanhood), is stuck in the 1990s musically, is always on the hunt for a new photography book and never passes up bubble tea.

Allison works random day jobs, freelances as a graphic designer and photographer, prints entirely too many JSTOR articles, and is always on the hunt for a new bourbon.

What is your craft/career/creative expression?

We live in the space of photo-based art — from traditional fine art photography to mixed-medium to image appropriation.

How long have you been working at your craft?

MAMBU BADU will have its fourth birthday on September 20, 2014.

Danielle has been a photographer for most of her life, but didn’t take it seriously until around 2007, when she was 22 and a year out of her undergraduate studies.

Kameelah’s mother says she was asking a lot of questions, taking observation notes, and sketching since she could talk and hold a pen.    Professionally? Five Years.

Yodith has been photographing since 2004 when she decided to pursue a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Art Photography.

Allison took a darkroom course in 2001 and has been obsessed since.

Why do you consider yourself a Black Weirdo?

Danielle is a Black Weirdo because she has always resided in the margins of the margins. Always slightly offbeat and off-kilter and never quite in lockstep with what’s popular. Which she realizes is actually an ok thing.

Kameelah is a Black Weirdo because she approaches the world with the curiosity of a 7-year-old kid.

Yodith is a Black Weirdo because she always considered herself to be in two worlds, of two cultures, which sometimes leaves her on the outside of both. Raised in America by immigrant parents, she is as undeniably African-American as she is an Ethiopian in America.

Allison is a Black Weirdo because normality is the nemesis of creativity.

Links/Social Media:

Mambu Badu  

@mambubadu - twitter, tumblr, instagram, and FB

MambuBadu.com -main site

Danielle 

@dascruggs- twitter, instagram

daniellescruggs.com - portfolio site

blog.daniellescrugs.com -journal/inspiration repository

Kameelah 

Twitter: @_kameelahr

Instagram: kameelahr

www.kameelahr.com - portfolio site

www.blog.kameelahr.com - blog

Yodith 

@yodithnprogress- twitter, instagram

Yodithd.com- portfolio/website

Yodithinprogress.tumblr.com- blog/inspirations

Allison

@alice_wonder - twitter

@missalicewonder - instagram

alicewonder.tumblr.com - visual reference materials and folio work

Upcoming events/ projects?

MAMBU BADU

May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

  • May 9-June 27: Group exhibition of photo and lens-based art at Vivid Solutions Gallery at the Anacostia Arts Center, opening May 9

Danielle

  • March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery
  • March 15-May 2: Work from my series The District is currently on display at the National Institutes of Health West Alcove Gallery

  • April 2014: Officially launching The Vanguard, an audio-visual exploration of the creative processes and practices of visual, literary, and performing artists in the D.C. Metropolitan area

  • July 2014: Solo exhibit of photographic work as part of DDAY Collective’s quarterly solo showcases

Kameelah

  • March 1-May 10 — Arts Educator // Brooklyn Museum — Teaching youth digital media class in conjunction with the exhibition, Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties (NYC) through a fictional department of the US government called DISPUS (Department for Inquiry on Social Problems and their Urgent Solutions) where students photograph and interview Brooklyn residents regarding social problems.

  • April 5th: Group Exhibit // The Afrofuturist Affair: The Time Travel Convention at Yell Gallery (Philly) // installed a time travel machine using found material culture and published a hand bound book entitled “how to time travel with your mother’s hair, used tea bags and found photographs: a handbook and starter kit for practical time travel” (edition of 10)

  • April 12th: Panelist // NYU for the Radical Archiving Conference // speaking with other archivists about my first solo installation No Instructions for Assembly where I created a 30’ x 20’ x 20’ installation using fragments and found material culture to reimagine my family’s archive and to  activate dialogues around a trinity of spatial trauma - homelessness, displacement, and forced migration.

  • April 18th: Group Exhibit // The Center for Book Arts - exploring themes born from transient religious encounters and found religious pamphlets over the past 7 years 1) debut of conceptual sound art project that features collected street sermons 2) a book of scripture prose that plays with intertextuality, William S. Boroughs’ aleatory cut-up literary methods, Jean Lescure of Oulipo’s N+7 procedure, and Harryette Mullen’s abecedarian games 3) a reinterpreted subway map and 4) a series of digital c-prints of religious sites (NYC)

  • June 13th: Artist Talk // Center for Book Arts (NYC)

  • May 17th:  Panelist // Queens Museum for Open Engagement Conference, “Dropping In/Dropping Out of Communities” — discussing rituals and ethics around social practice art work in communities that may not be our own (NYC)

  • May/June: Group Exhibit // (Can’t share all the deets now but it will be a large installation that takes over an entire one bedroom apartment to explore ideas of democratized archiving, vestigial flickers and audience activation of spaces)

  • July 2014: Artist-in-Residence // Vermont Studio Center - will be working on a series of large text drawings and a javascript-based program exploring the parallels between computer errors and the messages and microaggressions marginalized people encounter (VT)

  • July 2014: Teaching Artist-in-Residence // Working Classroom, teaching 2 week class around using found materials to create installations and sculptural pieces that address migration, transition, and displacement  (NM)

  • August 2014: Continuing work documenting black religious communities in the North East

Yodith

Currently working on an archival project involving slides photographed by my uncle in in the 1960s during his world travels.

nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

nohighs:

YOU REALLY THINK A FUCKIN PANCAKE IS GONNA FIX THIS HEATHER

mcnallyperiodicals:

GRANTA, #127, Japan. I experienced an intense emotional resonance with the (eerie) first story here, “A Clean Marriage”. From the editors: "Everyone knows this country and no one knows it. Here are twenty new Japans by its writers and artists, and by residents and visitors and neighbours. A special issue of GRANTA, published simultaneously in Japanese and English."

buying this issue…immediately.

mcnallyperiodicals:

GRANTA, #127, Japan. I experienced an intense emotional resonance with the (eerie) first story here, “A Clean Marriage”. From the editors: "Everyone knows this country and no one knows it. Here are twenty new Japans by its writers and artists, and by residents and visitors and neighbours. A special issue of GRANTA, published simultaneously in Japanese and English."

buying this issue…immediately.

cre8tivesilence:

…and then you shoot your cousin,  The Roots album cover artwork by Romare Bearden.

cre8tivesilence:

…and then you shoot your cousin,  The Roots album cover artwork by Romare Bearden.

gotemcoach:

Yo, that’s some bullsh**, man.  Be cool, toy makers.

I lol’d

gotemcoach:

Yo, that’s some bullsh**, man.  Be cool, toy makers.

I lol’d

manufactoriel:

Les Statues meurent aussi (un film d’Alain Renais et Chris Marker 1953)